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Posts For: June 3, 2008

Sometimes Less Is More

Barack Obama: “I am absolutely certain that generations from now, we will be able to look back and tell our children that this was the moment when we began to provide care for the sick and good jobs to the jobless; this was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal.” There is a bizarre arrogance. Or is it ignorance? Or just youthful overreach? He does know that we have had government paid health care for decades and that real people actually do work in America, sometimes after they have been unemployed for some time( i.e. jobless), right?

At some point will voters say, come on? Maybe yes, maybe no. But they might listen better if they weren’t being yelled at by someone who really hasn’t ever provided health care or jobs, let alone changed the ocean levels.

Barack Obama: “I am absolutely certain that generations from now, we will be able to look back and tell our children that this was the moment when we began to provide care for the sick and good jobs to the jobless; this was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal.” There is a bizarre arrogance. Or is it ignorance? Or just youthful overreach? He does know that we have had government paid health care for decades and that real people actually do work in America, sometimes after they have been unemployed for some time( i.e. jobless), right?

At some point will voters say, come on? Maybe yes, maybe no. But they might listen better if they weren’t being yelled at by someone who really hasn’t ever provided health care or jobs, let alone changed the ocean levels.

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Hillary Clinton’s Fatal Attraction

It just occurred to me that Hillary Clinton saying that she will make sure her 18 million voters won’t be taken for granted, won’t be invisible the way they were before, is the political equivalent of Glenn Close telling Michael Douglas, “I won’t be IGNORED, Paul Dan!”

[youtube]http://youtube.com/watch?v=xh1h79an7xg[/youtube]

It just occurred to me that Hillary Clinton saying that she will make sure her 18 million voters won’t be taken for granted, won’t be invisible the way they were before, is the political equivalent of Glenn Close telling Michael Douglas, “I won’t be IGNORED, Paul Dan!”

[youtube]http://youtube.com/watch?v=xh1h79an7xg[/youtube]

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Gaps

Barack Obama had rhetorical lift and volume tonight. John McCain had neither but quite a bit of substance. On the issue of “accomplishments” Obama seemed peeved that McCain would not acknowledge his own accomplishments. Juan Williams observes on Fox that he is not sure what Obama refers to since his accomplishments are scanty.

So the struggle for McCain will be to get some presentation skills. The struggle for Obama is to convince people he has the gravitas to be President. McCain will argue Obama’s agenda is rewarmed liberalism; Obama will say not.

And it is on these gaps and contrasts that the campaign will be run.

Barack Obama had rhetorical lift and volume tonight. John McCain had neither but quite a bit of substance. On the issue of “accomplishments” Obama seemed peeved that McCain would not acknowledge his own accomplishments. Juan Williams observes on Fox that he is not sure what Obama refers to since his accomplishments are scanty.

So the struggle for McCain will be to get some presentation skills. The struggle for Obama is to convince people he has the gravitas to be President. McCain will argue Obama’s agenda is rewarmed liberalism; Obama will say not.

And it is on these gaps and contrasts that the campaign will be run.

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Barack Takes It a Little Too Far

“This was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal.” This moment? Really? Inside an arena in the Twin Cities?

“This was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal.” This moment? Really? Inside an arena in the Twin Cities?

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Stop With the Yelling

He’s a great speaker, but really, a little variation in tone might help a bit. Will America enjoy being screamed at?

He’s a great speaker, but really, a little variation in tone might help a bit. Will America enjoy being screamed at?

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Now He Gives The Rules

Don’t bring up religion. Don’t bring up patriotism.

But he is addressing the accusation that he lacks experience and bipartisan achievement, albeit in general terms as he reviews his time as a community organizer and during his tenure in the Senate. Unlike McCain he doesn’t review any specifics. I suspect McCain will want to talk about Obama’s record more than Obama will want to talk about Obama’s record.

Don’t bring up religion. Don’t bring up patriotism.

But he is addressing the accusation that he lacks experience and bipartisan achievement, albeit in general terms as he reviews his time as a community organizer and during his tenure in the Senate. Unlike McCain he doesn’t review any specifics. I suspect McCain will want to talk about Obama’s record more than Obama will want to talk about Obama’s record.

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Good Lord, Smile Once.

He sure doesn’t look happy to have won.

He sure doesn’t look happy to have won.

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The Key To Obama’s Cadence

Here’s what he does, over and over again:

Ya-DA-da, Ya-DA-da, YA DAHHHHHH.

Ya-DA-da, Ya-DA-da, YA DAHHHHHH.

YA DA YA DA YAH DAH!

Here’s what he does, over and over again:

Ya-DA-da, Ya-DA-da, YA DAHHHHHH.

Ya-DA-da, Ya-DA-da, YA DAHHHHHH.

YA DA YA DA YAH DAH!

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Obama’s Speech

Barack Obama praises Hillary Clinton, but sounds like he’d be just as happy to have her in the Senate working on universal health care.

When he says he wants to “refocus on Al Qaeda” in Afghanistan, he doesn’t sound like he is rethinking the surge or noticed the progress we have made. And he’s still talking about meeting with those “petty dictators.” Again, someone should tell him that Roosevelt didn’t meet with Tojo, nor did Kennedy or any other president meet with Castro.

But clearly he wants to get off foreign policy and pivots to domestic policy as we walks us through the states and their travails.

The crowd is happy,  but the tone a little angrier than I would have imagined. Nevertheless the portrait is compelling and the moment historic.

Barack Obama praises Hillary Clinton, but sounds like he’d be just as happy to have her in the Senate working on universal health care.

When he says he wants to “refocus on Al Qaeda” in Afghanistan, he doesn’t sound like he is rethinking the surge or noticed the progress we have made. And he’s still talking about meeting with those “petty dictators.” Again, someone should tell him that Roosevelt didn’t meet with Tojo, nor did Kennedy or any other president meet with Castro.

But clearly he wants to get off foreign policy and pivots to domestic policy as we walks us through the states and their travails.

The crowd is happy,  but the tone a little angrier than I would have imagined. Nevertheless the portrait is compelling and the moment historic.

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The Speech Gap

We’re seeing it tonight. McCain, whose best speeches achieve a quiet intensity that creeps up on you when you’re not watching, just didn’t have the performing juice. Obama, who hasn’t been at his best these past couple of months, is on fire this evening.

We’re seeing it tonight. McCain, whose best speeches achieve a quiet intensity that creeps up on you when you’re not watching, just didn’t have the performing juice. Obama, who hasn’t been at his best these past couple of months, is on fire this evening.

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And In South Dakota. . .

Clinton leads 56 to 44% and is the declared winner.  Not like she needed any encouragement to keep this up.

Clinton leads 56 to 44% and is the declared winner.  Not like she needed any encouragement to keep this up.

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Re:Hillary Speech

You can say that again, John. You didn’t know where it was going and you didn’t know if she was serious or not. And taunting him that she got 18 million voters and that she matches up better against John McCain seemed an odd way to get what she wants, if she actually wants the VP slot. If he crumbles now and gives it to her, no one will ever believe he can stand up to anyone. It was part temper tantrum ( choose me or I take my 18 million friends home) and part therapy session. Perhaps it can be a mini-series. I, for one, would turn in every week.

You can say that again, John. You didn’t know where it was going and you didn’t know if she was serious or not. And taunting him that she got 18 million voters and that she matches up better against John McCain seemed an odd way to get what she wants, if she actually wants the VP slot. If he crumbles now and gives it to her, no one will ever believe he can stand up to anyone. It was part temper tantrum ( choose me or I take my 18 million friends home) and part therapy session. Perhaps it can be a mini-series. I, for one, would turn in every week.

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Hillary’s Speech

Jen, you call it peculiar. But you have to admit it was riveting. You don’t get psychodrama like this very often. It’s like political reality TV.

Jen, you call it peculiar. But you have to admit it was riveting. You don’t get psychodrama like this very often. It’s like political reality TV.

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Congratulations For What?

The most peculiar speech I’ve heard in awhile. What did she congratulate Barack Obama for, exactly? And she is not leaving, but she wants to unite the party. She may want the VP slot, but she steps on Obama’s day and makes herself an annoyance. She won’t be making any decisions tonight she tells us. And she wants to hear from her 18 million voters. Who knows, it may take months to read all the comments, right? Bizarre.

The most peculiar speech I’ve heard in awhile. What did she congratulate Barack Obama for, exactly? And she is not leaving, but she wants to unite the party. She may want the VP slot, but she steps on Obama’s day and makes herself an annoyance. She won’t be making any decisions tonight she tells us. And she wants to hear from her 18 million voters. Who knows, it may take months to read all the comments, right? Bizarre.

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A Lot of People Are Asking, “What Does Hillary Want?”

That’s what Hillary Clinton just said. Her answer: She said she wants her 18 million voters to be respected. Message: Give me the vice presidency or there’s gonna be trouble.

That’s what Hillary Clinton just said. Her answer: She said she wants her 18 million voters to be respected. Message: Give me the vice presidency or there’s gonna be trouble.

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The other speech tonight…

Tonight Israeli prime minister Ehud Olmert addressed the AIPAC policy conference currently underway in Washington, and as expected Iran was the centerpiece of his presentation. He made clear that the military option against the Iranian nuclear program remains very much on the table, if not a main course warming in the oven:

The Iranian threat must be stopped by all possible means. International economic and political sanctions on Iran, as crucial as they may be, are only an initial step, and must be dramatically increased. Iran’s defiance of international resolutions and its continued tactics of deception and denial leave no doubt as to the urgent need for more drastic and robust measures. The sanctions must be clearly defined and religiously enforced. Any willingness to overlook Iranian violations or justify Iran’s questionable tactics will immediately be interpreted as a sign of weakness and will only encourage them to proceed with more vigor.

He then called on the nations of the world to individually impose sanctions on Iran:

Each and every country must understand that the long-term cost of a nuclear Iran greatly outweighs the short-term benefits of doing business with Iran. … Sanctions can be imposed on the export of gasoline to Iran and they can be imposed on countries which refine gasoline for Iran. Governments should announce that Iranian businessmen are no longer welcome in their countries, and that funds arriving from or channeled to Iran should not be transferred through their banks.

Then there’s Syria, about which Olmert articulated only a few platitudes, telegraphing the improbability of the current talks:

Syria is currently a threat to regional stability, but if it ultimately makes the choice to have peace relations with Israel, for which it will have to disengage from its allies in the Axis of Evil, this will constitute a drastic, strategic shift in the entire Middle East.

At least he threw in an Axis of Evil reference, which in regard to Syria is about the biggest acknowledgment he’s made of the existence of the Bush administration. Olmert’s Syria gambit is a continuing insult to Washington, which in 2005, after several years of fruitless engagement made a wise decision: that it would not permit Syria, as during the Clinton years, to dance at two weddings — to host terror groups in Damascus, ally with Iran, sponsor Hezbollah, dominate Lebanon, and encourage proxy wars on Israel while also enjoying western engagement, peace overtures, and lavish international attention. Today even the Arab states have ostracized Syria. But not Olmert. One hopes that a stern reprimand will be administered to him in Washington. (For more, please read this excellent piece by David Schenker.)

On the Arab states:

These nations, which want to promote peace and which fully recognize the direct threat to them posed by a nuclear Iran and by foreign and domestic extremism, now have a golden opportunity to support a process of normalization and reconciliation with Israel, which will isolate Iran and the extremists and help foil their pursuit of regional dominance.

I’m not so sure Olmert is accurately presenting the regional dynamics. The rise of Iran, and especially the regime’s endeavor to position itself as the champion of “resistance” in the Middle East, has placed the Sunni states in a position that is far more awkward than Olmert lets on. Sure, the Sunnis are worried about Iran, primarily because they’re concerned about the stability of their own regimes. But publicly allying with Israel would present its own risks to Arab regimes — think of what happened to Sadat in 1981. The Sunnis have been moving closer to Israel, and may well continue doing so; but this will be extraordinarily discreet, certainly without photo-ops.

The conclusion. Perhaps Olmert has a mischievous speechwriter, or a terribly dark sense of humor. In noting the cloud over his government, he remarked that “Israeli politics is accustomed to all kinds of trials and tribulations.” Well, there hasn’t been an indictment just yet.

Tonight Israeli prime minister Ehud Olmert addressed the AIPAC policy conference currently underway in Washington, and as expected Iran was the centerpiece of his presentation. He made clear that the military option against the Iranian nuclear program remains very much on the table, if not a main course warming in the oven:

The Iranian threat must be stopped by all possible means. International economic and political sanctions on Iran, as crucial as they may be, are only an initial step, and must be dramatically increased. Iran’s defiance of international resolutions and its continued tactics of deception and denial leave no doubt as to the urgent need for more drastic and robust measures. The sanctions must be clearly defined and religiously enforced. Any willingness to overlook Iranian violations or justify Iran’s questionable tactics will immediately be interpreted as a sign of weakness and will only encourage them to proceed with more vigor.

He then called on the nations of the world to individually impose sanctions on Iran:

Each and every country must understand that the long-term cost of a nuclear Iran greatly outweighs the short-term benefits of doing business with Iran. … Sanctions can be imposed on the export of gasoline to Iran and they can be imposed on countries which refine gasoline for Iran. Governments should announce that Iranian businessmen are no longer welcome in their countries, and that funds arriving from or channeled to Iran should not be transferred through their banks.

Then there’s Syria, about which Olmert articulated only a few platitudes, telegraphing the improbability of the current talks:

Syria is currently a threat to regional stability, but if it ultimately makes the choice to have peace relations with Israel, for which it will have to disengage from its allies in the Axis of Evil, this will constitute a drastic, strategic shift in the entire Middle East.

At least he threw in an Axis of Evil reference, which in regard to Syria is about the biggest acknowledgment he’s made of the existence of the Bush administration. Olmert’s Syria gambit is a continuing insult to Washington, which in 2005, after several years of fruitless engagement made a wise decision: that it would not permit Syria, as during the Clinton years, to dance at two weddings — to host terror groups in Damascus, ally with Iran, sponsor Hezbollah, dominate Lebanon, and encourage proxy wars on Israel while also enjoying western engagement, peace overtures, and lavish international attention. Today even the Arab states have ostracized Syria. But not Olmert. One hopes that a stern reprimand will be administered to him in Washington. (For more, please read this excellent piece by David Schenker.)

On the Arab states:

These nations, which want to promote peace and which fully recognize the direct threat to them posed by a nuclear Iran and by foreign and domestic extremism, now have a golden opportunity to support a process of normalization and reconciliation with Israel, which will isolate Iran and the extremists and help foil their pursuit of regional dominance.

I’m not so sure Olmert is accurately presenting the regional dynamics. The rise of Iran, and especially the regime’s endeavor to position itself as the champion of “resistance” in the Middle East, has placed the Sunni states in a position that is far more awkward than Olmert lets on. Sure, the Sunnis are worried about Iran, primarily because they’re concerned about the stability of their own regimes. But publicly allying with Israel would present its own risks to Arab regimes — think of what happened to Sadat in 1981. The Sunnis have been moving closer to Israel, and may well continue doing so; but this will be extraordinarily discreet, certainly without photo-ops.

The conclusion. Perhaps Olmert has a mischievous speechwriter, or a terribly dark sense of humor. In noting the cloud over his government, he remarked that “Israeli politics is accustomed to all kinds of trials and tribulations.” Well, there hasn’t been an indictment just yet.

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McCain Speech

He had multiple tasks tonight and hit most of them in a speech delivered in front of a board with the slogan “A Leader We Can Believe In.” (You know where he cribbed that one.) First, lots of praise for Hillary Clinton. Yes, he is going after those voters who think, as he put it, that she “deserves a lot more appreciation than she sometimes received. ” Second, he set out to defuse the “Bush clone” attack. It won’t be done in a single speech, but he asked voters not to buy what will certainly become an Obama refrain. On this, he pulled out the “you know me better than that” card. (That’s a separate item on the must do list: emphasize experience and that fact that he is a known quantity.) And he reeled off his list of disagreements with President Bush.

He also tried to shift the “change” argument to what kind of change — right or wrong, forward or back — which each candidate is offering. (“I have a few years on my opponent, so I am surprised that a young man has bought in to so many failed ideas.”) Although not heavy on specifics he did touch on the list of areas from education to transportation to energy he intends to reform. (Not exactly Yuval Levin, but a start.)

But the toughest part, not surprisingly, was on Iraq, where he went after Obama:

Senator Obama opposed the new strategy, and, after promising not to, voted to deny funds to the soldiers who have done a brilliant and brave job of carrying it out. Yet in the last year we have seen the success of that plan as violence has fallen to a four year low; Sunni insurgents have joined us in the fight against al Qaeda; the Iraqi Army has taken the lead in places once lost to Sunni and Shia extremists; and the Iraqi Government has begun to make progress toward political reconciliation. None of this progress would have happened had we not changed course over a year ago. And all of this progress would be lost if Senator Obama had his way and began to withdraw our forces from Iraq without concern for conditions on the ground and the advice of commanders in the field. Americans ought to be concerned about the judgment of a presidential candidate who says he’s ready to talk, in person and without conditions, with tyrants from Havana to Pyongyang, but hasn’t traveled to Iraq to meet with General Petraeus, and see for himself the progress he threatens to reverse.

And finally, he needed to begin the examination of Obama’s record. He did that by invoking Obama’s lack of bipartisan accomplishments, his support of earmarks and the Bush-Cheney energy bill, and his reversion to protectionist pandering on trade. (“He’s an intelligent man, and he must know how foolish it is to think Americans can remain prosperous without opening new markets to our goods and services. But he feels he must defer to the special interests that support him. That’s not change we can believe in.’)

It was aggressive, feisty (especially the repeated mantra of “that’s not change we can believe in”), a bit funny and showed some growth in the McCain campaign’s strategy — a new determination to make this race about something, not just about the candidate. Still, I suspect the rather staid setting and energy level won’t compare well with what is sure to be the rock concert-like event for Obama later tonight. And on two final cosmetic notes, McCain looked a bit washed out in the setting and is improved (but not yet great) on the teleprompter.

He had multiple tasks tonight and hit most of them in a speech delivered in front of a board with the slogan “A Leader We Can Believe In.” (You know where he cribbed that one.) First, lots of praise for Hillary Clinton. Yes, he is going after those voters who think, as he put it, that she “deserves a lot more appreciation than she sometimes received. ” Second, he set out to defuse the “Bush clone” attack. It won’t be done in a single speech, but he asked voters not to buy what will certainly become an Obama refrain. On this, he pulled out the “you know me better than that” card. (That’s a separate item on the must do list: emphasize experience and that fact that he is a known quantity.) And he reeled off his list of disagreements with President Bush.

He also tried to shift the “change” argument to what kind of change — right or wrong, forward or back — which each candidate is offering. (“I have a few years on my opponent, so I am surprised that a young man has bought in to so many failed ideas.”) Although not heavy on specifics he did touch on the list of areas from education to transportation to energy he intends to reform. (Not exactly Yuval Levin, but a start.)

But the toughest part, not surprisingly, was on Iraq, where he went after Obama:

Senator Obama opposed the new strategy, and, after promising not to, voted to deny funds to the soldiers who have done a brilliant and brave job of carrying it out. Yet in the last year we have seen the success of that plan as violence has fallen to a four year low; Sunni insurgents have joined us in the fight against al Qaeda; the Iraqi Army has taken the lead in places once lost to Sunni and Shia extremists; and the Iraqi Government has begun to make progress toward political reconciliation. None of this progress would have happened had we not changed course over a year ago. And all of this progress would be lost if Senator Obama had his way and began to withdraw our forces from Iraq without concern for conditions on the ground and the advice of commanders in the field. Americans ought to be concerned about the judgment of a presidential candidate who says he’s ready to talk, in person and without conditions, with tyrants from Havana to Pyongyang, but hasn’t traveled to Iraq to meet with General Petraeus, and see for himself the progress he threatens to reverse.

And finally, he needed to begin the examination of Obama’s record. He did that by invoking Obama’s lack of bipartisan accomplishments, his support of earmarks and the Bush-Cheney energy bill, and his reversion to protectionist pandering on trade. (“He’s an intelligent man, and he must know how foolish it is to think Americans can remain prosperous without opening new markets to our goods and services. But he feels he must defer to the special interests that support him. That’s not change we can believe in.’)

It was aggressive, feisty (especially the repeated mantra of “that’s not change we can believe in”), a bit funny and showed some growth in the McCain campaign’s strategy — a new determination to make this race about something, not just about the candidate. Still, I suspect the rather staid setting and energy level won’t compare well with what is sure to be the rock concert-like event for Obama later tonight. And on two final cosmetic notes, McCain looked a bit washed out in the setting and is improved (but not yet great) on the teleprompter.

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An Astonishing Fact

A black man will be his party’s nominee to be president of the United States. If you were a betting man and you had to place a bet on who is going to win in November, you would be prudent to place it on him. He is a problematic candidate, but not because of his father’s ancestry; rather, because of his views. He will carry aloft the standard of a great political party and a powerful ideological coalition. This is a culminating moment for the United States.

A black man will be his party’s nominee to be president of the United States. If you were a betting man and you had to place a bet on who is going to win in November, you would be prudent to place it on him. He is a problematic candidate, but not because of his father’s ancestry; rather, because of his views. He will carry aloft the standard of a great political party and a powerful ideological coalition. This is a culminating moment for the United States.

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Even Before Jimmy Carter Endorses

While we are waiting for returns, Barack Obama’s appearance before AIPAC tomorrow is already drawing attention. It is no secret that he has some work to do in earning support from Jewish voters. Despite his efforts to lay blame for the impasse with American Jews on their irrational fears, it is his own words, his crop of current advisors and his prior associations with Palestinian activists which are the real causes of many Jews’ qualms. And already these prior, now inconvenient, associations are popping up. Here is a clip of one who attests to Obama’s change in tone.

It will be interesting to see how forthrightly Obama addresses the concerns of Jews (and non-Jews concerned about Israel) tomorrow.

While we are waiting for returns, Barack Obama’s appearance before AIPAC tomorrow is already drawing attention. It is no secret that he has some work to do in earning support from Jewish voters. Despite his efforts to lay blame for the impasse with American Jews on their irrational fears, it is his own words, his crop of current advisors and his prior associations with Palestinian activists which are the real causes of many Jews’ qualms. And already these prior, now inconvenient, associations are popping up. Here is a clip of one who attests to Obama’s change in tone.

It will be interesting to see how forthrightly Obama addresses the concerns of Jews (and non-Jews concerned about Israel) tomorrow.

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Things to Ponder

Should Barack Obama have asked Jimmy Carter to hold off on his endorsement until he finishes his AIPAC appearance tomorrow? I’m betting the McCain camp isn’t going to miss out on making a point of that one. And by the way, is Carter going to be given a featured speaking spot at the Democratic Convention in Denver?

Meanwhile, ABC’s The Note asks:

Just to throw this out there — what happens if we get another one of those famous split decisions tonight? Yes, the big story should be (and will be, by any measure) Obama’s securing the nomination, not a loss in Montana or South Dakota. But another loss would seem to, again, point out the gaping holes in Obama’s electoral coalition. As we’ve said, he’s stumbling past the finish line here.

So why is it that even when he’s the winner some Democratic primary voters won’t cast their ballots for him? Richard Cohen says they’re all a bunch of racists. Or is Obama not clearing the presidential bar for other reasons?

And finally, will McCain make the most of his time tonight with his speech from New Orleans to both differentiate himself from Bush, his greatest defensive challenge, and put Obama back on his heels on political extremism and/or inexperience, McCain’s great offensive opportunities? Whatever he does, the media is sure to pooh-pooh his performance in comparison to Obama, but if we have learned anything this primary season it is that the media regularly gets ignored by voters. That’s one trend McCain hopes will continue.

Should Barack Obama have asked Jimmy Carter to hold off on his endorsement until he finishes his AIPAC appearance tomorrow? I’m betting the McCain camp isn’t going to miss out on making a point of that one. And by the way, is Carter going to be given a featured speaking spot at the Democratic Convention in Denver?

Meanwhile, ABC’s The Note asks:

Just to throw this out there — what happens if we get another one of those famous split decisions tonight? Yes, the big story should be (and will be, by any measure) Obama’s securing the nomination, not a loss in Montana or South Dakota. But another loss would seem to, again, point out the gaping holes in Obama’s electoral coalition. As we’ve said, he’s stumbling past the finish line here.

So why is it that even when he’s the winner some Democratic primary voters won’t cast their ballots for him? Richard Cohen says they’re all a bunch of racists. Or is Obama not clearing the presidential bar for other reasons?

And finally, will McCain make the most of his time tonight with his speech from New Orleans to both differentiate himself from Bush, his greatest defensive challenge, and put Obama back on his heels on political extremism and/or inexperience, McCain’s great offensive opportunities? Whatever he does, the media is sure to pooh-pooh his performance in comparison to Obama, but if we have learned anything this primary season it is that the media regularly gets ignored by voters. That’s one trend McCain hopes will continue.

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