Commentary Magazine


Contentions

DeMint: I’ll Stop ‘Plan B’ in the Senate

There has been one question surrounding Mitch McConnell’s proposed “Plan B” for raising the debt ceiling—giving President Obama the ability to raise the limit on his own, temporarily, so the Republicans would not be held accountable for either a default or the lack of spending cuts in the event a “grand bargain” could not be reached: Could the plan pass the House?

Most of the attention has been focused on what Eric Cantor, who has become the voice of the more conservative House members, will accept. It has been assumed the key to passing McConnell’s plan in the Senate (and perhaps ultimately in the House as well) would be the Democrats’ approval.

But those assuming that made one mistake: they forgot about Jim DeMint. The South Carolina Tea Party favorite just announced via Twitter that he will “use every tool in Senate to stop passage of ‘Plan B’ blank check debt limit increase.”

DeMint rarely makes idle threats, so this is probably the final nail in the coffin of “Plan B.” Though John Boehner sought to downplay divisions within his ranks by saying he and Cantor are “in the foxhole” together, it is really he and McConnell who now find themselves sharing an increasingly empty foxhole.

This will also only amplify the attention on the GOP’s intraparty stress–a troublesome narrative for the GOP leaders. If McConnell needs DeMint’s approval, and Boehner needs Cantor’s, the Republicans and Democrats may be even farther apart on this issue than previously thought.

The New York Times has a story this morning on the ideological battle of which the debt ceiling negotiations are but one theater. “What makes a bipartisan ‘grand bargain’ so elusive is less the budget numbers, on which compromise could be in reach, than each side’s principles, which do not lend themselves to splitting the difference,” reporter Jackie Calmes writes.

DeMint just loudly reiterated his principles. So, what’s Plan C?



Join the discussion…

Are you a subscriber? Log in to comment »

Not a subscriber? Join the discussion today, subscribe to Commentary »





Welcome to Commentary Magazine.
We hope you enjoy your visit.
As a visitor to our site, you are allowed 8 free articles this month.
This is your first of 8 free articles.

If you are already a digital subscriber, log in here »

Print subscriber? For free access to the website and iPad, register here »

To subscribe, click here to see our subscription offers »

Please note this is an advertisement skip this ad
Clearly, you have a passion for ideas.
Subscribe today for unlimited digital access to the publication that shapes the minds of the people who shape our world.
Get for just
YOU HAVE READ OF 8 FREE ARTICLES THIS MONTH.
FOR JUST
YOU HAVE READ OF 8 FREE ARTICLES THIS MONTH.
FOR JUST
Welcome to Commentary Magazine.
We hope you enjoy your visit.
As a visitor, you are allowed 8 free articles.
This is your first article.
You have read of 8 free articles this month.
YOU HAVE READ 8 OF 8
FREE ARTICLES THIS MONTH.
for full access to
CommentaryMagazine.com
INCLUDES FULL ACCESS TO:
Digital subscriber?
Print subscriber? Get free access »
Call to subscribe: 1-800-829-6270
You can also subscribe
on your computer at
CommentaryMagazine.com.
LOG IN WITH YOUR
COMMENTARY MAGAZINE ID
Don't have a CommentaryMagazine.com log in?
CREATE A COMMENTARY
LOG IN ID
Enter you email address and password below. A confirmation email will be sent to the email address that you provide.