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The Rasmussen Poll’s Hidden Bonus for Current GOP Candidates

One theme of the Republican primary season has been voters’ dissatisfaction with the candidates. The apparent unworthiness of the candidates has been intense enough for Chris Christie to be asked every other day if he plans on running–because he simply must, the Republicans need him, the country needs him, etc.

The speculation has continued, but softened–as it has for Paul Ryan. In fact, the idea primary voters were so unhappy with their current choices had evolved into fretting over the “weakness” of the field, and the idea President Obama is a weak incumbent but might be let off the hook by even weaker GOP challengers. But the latest Rasmussen poll suggests this concern–fueled mostly by circular fussing, allowing it to gain momentum–may have encountered its expiration date.

It has been noted the poll is good for Rick Perry, who places second. Romney leads with 22 percent, Perry follows with 18, and Michele Bachmann comes in third with 16. But the more important numbers for the field are 4 percent and 9 percent–the voters who support other candidates who didn’t even reach the 1 percent mark, and the number of undecided voters, respectively. But even the undecided number is good for this field, since the undecideds are, more than likely, torn between two or more of the candidates actually running.

Abe put it well after the first major GOP debate (it was the second debate overall), for which expectations were quite low, especially on the left:

But generations of liberal American elites have grown so comfortably and hermetically homogenous they can no longer recognize passionate conservatism as anything other than a vibrant perversion, a laugh-riot freakshow of extremism that can’t compete in the serious political arena. That’s what we were supposed to get on Monday night’s debate. Instead we got the kind of level talk and policy precision that our president abandoned long ago in the rubble of the ObamaCare disaster.

It might well be thanks to Rick Perry acting as though he is certain to enter the race, but GOP voters’ nerves about the current field seem to have settled. Perhaps voters saw what Abe noticed–the candidates had a pretty solid grasp of the issues and were quite capable of discussing and debating them. Though many would still love to see a Christie candidacy or a Ryan-Rubio ticket, the current candidates–as shown by the Rasmussen poll–have earned the respect of the primary voters.


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