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Race Tightens in Pennsylvania

President Obama is jetting to Pennsylvania for several fundraising events today, but his failure to open a wide lead over Mitt Romney in the state is a troubling sign for his campaign. Pennsylvania is a must-win for Obama, and today’s Quinnipiac poll finds him falling short of the 50 percent mark, with just a 6-point lead (h/t HotAir):

With strong support from women and independent voters, President Barack Obama leads Gov. Mitt Romney 46 – 40 among Pennsylvania voters, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released today. Romney would do a better job on the economy, voters say 49 – 41 percent.

The matchup compares to a 47 – 39 percent Obama lead in a May 3 survey by the independent Quinnipiac (KWIN-uh-pe-ack) University.

In today’s survey, women back President Obama 51 – 36 percent, while men tip to Romney 44 – 40 percent. Obama leads 83 – 10 percent among Democrats and 43 – 35 percent among independent voters, while Republican voters back Romney 80 – 7 percent.

At HotAir, Ed Morrissey writes that this poll appears to be the latest in a trend:

What’s interesting about this result is its consistency with the entire Q-poll series. In five polls taken since last December, Obama hasn’t led Romney by more than eight points — which happened in the previous poll, as noted above. One of the two polls taken in March had the same exact outcome as today’s, while the other showed Obama only three points up on Romney. While the entire series could be an outlier, this particular result and the relative position of Romney to Obama in this poll is no outlier within the series.

The Romney campaign might be feeling optimistic, too, as he’s penciling in Pennsylvania on his upcoming bus tour. Romney has a lot to overcome in the state, even if he begins campaigning seriously there. But it’s not a place Obama expected to have to fight particularly hard in. No wonder the president has been fundraising so frantically recently — it looks like he’ll have to pour more money than expected into states that were once considered fairly safe for him, including Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania.