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Putin, Europe, and Historical Amnesia

The day that pro-Russian separatists shot down a Malaysian airliner last week, I wrote a lengthy item outlining the steps that needed to be taken in response–everything from providing arms and training to the Ukrainian armed forces to slapping stiffer sanctions on Russian trade. Since then Russia’s proxies have further aggravated the situation by delaying access to the crash site to investigators and apparently looting many of the victims’ belongings.

It’s been less than a full week since the crash happened, so perhaps the appropriate Western response is still coming. I hope so. But it sure doesn’t look like it. Instead the West appears to be as pusillanimous as ever in the face of Russian aggression.

A meeting of European Union foreign ministers could not even agree to impose an arms embargo on Russia, because the French don’t want to refund 1.1 billion euros ($1.5 billion) that Russia has paid for the first of two Mistral-class amphibious assault warships due to be delivered in October. “We should have had an arms embargo quite some time ago,” said Carl Bildt, the Swedish foreign minister. “To deliver arms to Russia in this situation is somewhat difficult to defend, to put it mildly.”

Just as difficult to comprehend is Europe’s willingness to continue serving as a financial outlet for rich Russians and big Russian companies. British Prime Minister David Cameron talks tough (“Russia cannot expect to continue enjoying access to European markets, European capital, European knowledge and technical expertise while she fuels conflict in one of Europe’s neighbors”), but he’s not rushing to impose unilateral sanctions on Russia either–something that could bite given the level of Russian investment in the City of London as well as in British properties of various sorts ranging from football clubs to swank apartments.

Naturally Europeans offer lots of excuses for inaction–for example one hears that sanctions now would lead Putin’s minions to discontinue their cooperation with crash-site investigators. Note how something that should be done as a matter of course–giving investigators access to a crime scene–is now being held hostage to the whims of drunken Russian thugs.

The U.S. is little better. While President Obama has imposed slightly stiffer sanctions than the Europeans, even he has not ordered the kind of “sectoral” sanctions that he has threatened (another red line crossed with impunity!). Only such sanctions would really punish Russia by denying Russian companies and individuals access to U.S. financial markets and to dollar-denominated trades.

All of this is entirely predictable, of course, but dismaying nevertheless. In a sense, the worse that Russian misconduct is, the less likely it is to be punished because the more evil that Putin does–the more territory his minions seize, the more innocents they kill–the more that the Europeans are afraid to provoke him. He’s a bad man, they figure; why mess with him?

The result, of course, is only to encourage Putin to commit further crimes. We’ve seen this movie before–it played across the continent in the 1930s and it didn’t have a happy ending. It says something about our historical amnesia that we are so ready to watch a repeat performance.



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2 Responses to “Putin, Europe, and Historical Amnesia”

  1. ROMAN SZEREMETA says:

    Bit manichean as Peter Wehner would say and decidedly unnuanced.
    The geopolitical situation is confused with the US abrogating its role as global guarantor, an insecure Russia,an assertive China and a pretty useless EU (I think thats what the U stands for!).
    What ever happened to the old carrot and stick.
    We are getting a lot of grandstanding, see Seth’s “Britain’s…”. I would agree with Seth about action BUT action directed at achievable outcomes ie deals!
    Posturing wont help the Ukrainians or anyone else!

  2. ROMAN SZEREMETA says:

    Bit manichean as Peter Wehner would say and decidedly unnuanced.
    The geopolitical situation is confused with the US abrogating its role as global guarantor, an insecure Russia/Putin, an assertive China and a pretty useless EU (I think that’s what the U stands for!).
    What ever happened to the old carrot and stick.
    We are getting a lot of grandstanding, see Seth’s “Britain’s…”. I would agree with Seth about action BUT action directed at achievable outcomes ie deals!
    Posturing wont help the Ukrainians or anyone else!




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