Commentary Magazine


Topic: American Association of State Climatologists

Copenhagen All Over Again

This Fox News report suggests that Copenhagen, the site of Obama’s Olympic-size humiliation, may be (to borrow a phrase from Yogi Berra) déjà vu all over again for the president:

At both meetings, the president scheduled very brief appearances, planning to arrive early and be long gone before any decision was reached. And, coincidentally, the destination in both cases was Copenhagen, Denmark. … Patrick Michaels, former president of the American Association of State Climatologists and environmental fellow at the Cato Institute, said he has his doubts. ”The president is carrying nothing credible in his pocket, so how can he compel people to do something credible?” he said, referring to the fact that Congress has not passed its cap-and-trade bill.

Even fellow Democrat Sen. Jim Webb is reminding Obama that he doesn’t have “the unilateral power to commit the government of the United States to certain standards that may be agreed upon” in Copenhagen. And then there is the peculiar challenge of an international confab to decide how to micromanage national economies based on science that is now the subject of comedy routines. It doesn’t seem quite, well, credible.

To avoid another major embarrassment, it’s possible that, as the Obami have been forced to do many times already, they will come up with a photo-op, or a meaningless working agreement to get to work on an agreement. Still, one wonders why the president is once again putting his prestige on the line when the chances of a payoff are slim. Well, I suppose it beats answering media questions at home about the looming Iranian threat and our domestic economic woes (and yes, another national unemployment figure due out Friday).

This Fox News report suggests that Copenhagen, the site of Obama’s Olympic-size humiliation, may be (to borrow a phrase from Yogi Berra) déjà vu all over again for the president:

At both meetings, the president scheduled very brief appearances, planning to arrive early and be long gone before any decision was reached. And, coincidentally, the destination in both cases was Copenhagen, Denmark. … Patrick Michaels, former president of the American Association of State Climatologists and environmental fellow at the Cato Institute, said he has his doubts. ”The president is carrying nothing credible in his pocket, so how can he compel people to do something credible?” he said, referring to the fact that Congress has not passed its cap-and-trade bill.

Even fellow Democrat Sen. Jim Webb is reminding Obama that he doesn’t have “the unilateral power to commit the government of the United States to certain standards that may be agreed upon” in Copenhagen. And then there is the peculiar challenge of an international confab to decide how to micromanage national economies based on science that is now the subject of comedy routines. It doesn’t seem quite, well, credible.

To avoid another major embarrassment, it’s possible that, as the Obami have been forced to do many times already, they will come up with a photo-op, or a meaningless working agreement to get to work on an agreement. Still, one wonders why the president is once again putting his prestige on the line when the chances of a payoff are slim. Well, I suppose it beats answering media questions at home about the looming Iranian threat and our domestic economic woes (and yes, another national unemployment figure due out Friday).

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