Commentary Magazine


Topic: Campbell Brown

Specter Did Specter In

Margaret Carlson has two smart observations about the political demise of Arlen Specter. First, on top of his general toxicity to Democratic candidates, Obama helped do in Specter by nominating Elena Kagan, “which reminded people of that long-ago performance by Specter as he slammed Anita Hill during the Clarence Thomas hearings. Not too long ago, before Specter pledged Democrats his troth, Specter voted against the White House nomination of Kagan for solicitor general. Not surprisingly, he had a hard time finding takers for his reasons why she wasn’t qualified for that job — but should be confirmed to serve on the Supreme Court.”

In this we saw vintage Obama as well as classic Specter. Obama didn’t have a care in the world that his Kagan selection (which has gone over like a lead balloon with his base) would highlight Specter’s lack of core convictions. And Specter was at his typical squishiness in trying to disguise his true motives in these confirmation battles: ensuring his own re-election.

And then, unlike Campbell Brown, Snarlin’ Arlen went out in true form: “Specter did not go quietly into that good night, conceding in the shortest of speeches with no kind words for Sestak. He could have gone out gracefully but so few do — because losing is a little like dying for some.” It was one more reminder that Specter lacks both principles and class.

Politicians don’t often get their just desserts. The crooked ones often avoid prosecution. The ones who go back on campaign promises are rarely held accountable. In sleazy backroom deals, while supposedly representing “the people,” all too many secure comfy jobs on K Street that can benefit their own financial future at the expense of the taxpayers. But once in a while, a clarifying and fully satisfying moment comes along. This is one of them. And on this there is bipartisan agreement: Specter’s forced retirement is good for the Senate and good for the country.

Margaret Carlson has two smart observations about the political demise of Arlen Specter. First, on top of his general toxicity to Democratic candidates, Obama helped do in Specter by nominating Elena Kagan, “which reminded people of that long-ago performance by Specter as he slammed Anita Hill during the Clarence Thomas hearings. Not too long ago, before Specter pledged Democrats his troth, Specter voted against the White House nomination of Kagan for solicitor general. Not surprisingly, he had a hard time finding takers for his reasons why she wasn’t qualified for that job — but should be confirmed to serve on the Supreme Court.”

In this we saw vintage Obama as well as classic Specter. Obama didn’t have a care in the world that his Kagan selection (which has gone over like a lead balloon with his base) would highlight Specter’s lack of core convictions. And Specter was at his typical squishiness in trying to disguise his true motives in these confirmation battles: ensuring his own re-election.

And then, unlike Campbell Brown, Snarlin’ Arlen went out in true form: “Specter did not go quietly into that good night, conceding in the shortest of speeches with no kind words for Sestak. He could have gone out gracefully but so few do — because losing is a little like dying for some.” It was one more reminder that Specter lacks both principles and class.

Politicians don’t often get their just desserts. The crooked ones often avoid prosecution. The ones who go back on campaign promises are rarely held accountable. In sleazy backroom deals, while supposedly representing “the people,” all too many secure comfy jobs on K Street that can benefit their own financial future at the expense of the taxpayers. But once in a while, a clarifying and fully satisfying moment comes along. This is one of them. And on this there is bipartisan agreement: Specter’s forced retirement is good for the Senate and good for the country.

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Campbell Cans the Spin

In announcing her decision to leave CNN, Campbell Brown put out this statement, which included this:

I’m pretty sure the last time any anchor could honestly ignore ratings was well before I was born. Of course I pay attention to ratings. And simply put, the ratings for my program are not where I would like them to be. It is largely for this reason that I am stepping down as anchor of CNN’s “Campbell Brown.”

To be clear: this is my decision, and one that I have been thinking about for some time. As for why, I could have said, that I am stepping down to spend more time with my children (which I truly want to do). Or that I am leaving to pursue other opportunities (which I also truly want to do). But I have never had much tolerance for others’ spin, so I can’t imagine trying to stomach my own. The simple fact is that not enough people want to watch my program, and I owe it to myself and to CNN to get out of the way so that CNN can try something else.

The entire statement is honest, unvarnished, devoid of spin, and gracious — and therefore quite impressive. The problems she faced rested more with her network than with her. But in exiting CNN, Ms. Brown set a standard others in the media, and in politics, should strive for.

In announcing her decision to leave CNN, Campbell Brown put out this statement, which included this:

I’m pretty sure the last time any anchor could honestly ignore ratings was well before I was born. Of course I pay attention to ratings. And simply put, the ratings for my program are not where I would like them to be. It is largely for this reason that I am stepping down as anchor of CNN’s “Campbell Brown.”

To be clear: this is my decision, and one that I have been thinking about for some time. As for why, I could have said, that I am stepping down to spend more time with my children (which I truly want to do). Or that I am leaving to pursue other opportunities (which I also truly want to do). But I have never had much tolerance for others’ spin, so I can’t imagine trying to stomach my own. The simple fact is that not enough people want to watch my program, and I owe it to myself and to CNN to get out of the way so that CNN can try something else.

The entire statement is honest, unvarnished, devoid of spin, and gracious — and therefore quite impressive. The problems she faced rested more with her network than with her. But in exiting CNN, Ms. Brown set a standard others in the media, and in politics, should strive for.

Read Less