Commentary Magazine


Topic: Clinton secretary of commerce

Too Late?

Clinton secretary of commerce and member of a Democratic political dynasty, William M. Daley, sounds the warning for his party. He sees “political dangers” and “ominous poll results.” The Democrats, he says, are drifting too far Left, scaring Americans and risking a political catastrophe. He observes “the quantitative expression of the swing bloc of American politics slipping away.” What to do? It is not a difficult fix, he says:

All that is required for the Democratic Party to recover its political footing is to acknowledge that the agenda of the party’s most liberal supporters has not won the support of a majority of Americans — and, based on that recognition, to steer a more moderate course on the key issues of the day, from health care to the economy to the environment to Afghanistan.

Well, it’s harder than it sounds because early this morning on a straight party line vote the Democrats in the Senate passed a huge government power grab. In the words of Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell from the floor “we’re left with party line votes in the middle of the night, a couple of sweetheart deals to get it over the finish line, and a public that’s outraged.” So does the Democratic majority and White House want to implement the course correction suggested by Daley and dump the whole thing? And what about their plans  for a massive tax hike in the guise of letting the Bush tax cuts expire?

You see, to move back to the center, the Democrats and the White House would have to do a political about-face and repudiate a year of tax-and-spend policies. That might be advisable, but how likely is it? Not very. After all, Democrats fought tooth and nail for ObamaCare and Nancy Pelosi made her troops walk the plank on cap-and-trade. Daley says that if the Democrats would only follow his advice, “it may be too late to avoid some losses in 2010, [but] it is not too late to avoid the kind of rout that redraws the political map.” But they can’t–they’ve made their policy and political choices. If Daley is correct, then, after a year of Obamaism, we may be looking forward to that redrawn political map.

Clinton secretary of commerce and member of a Democratic political dynasty, William M. Daley, sounds the warning for his party. He sees “political dangers” and “ominous poll results.” The Democrats, he says, are drifting too far Left, scaring Americans and risking a political catastrophe. He observes “the quantitative expression of the swing bloc of American politics slipping away.” What to do? It is not a difficult fix, he says:

All that is required for the Democratic Party to recover its political footing is to acknowledge that the agenda of the party’s most liberal supporters has not won the support of a majority of Americans — and, based on that recognition, to steer a more moderate course on the key issues of the day, from health care to the economy to the environment to Afghanistan.

Well, it’s harder than it sounds because early this morning on a straight party line vote the Democrats in the Senate passed a huge government power grab. In the words of Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell from the floor “we’re left with party line votes in the middle of the night, a couple of sweetheart deals to get it over the finish line, and a public that’s outraged.” So does the Democratic majority and White House want to implement the course correction suggested by Daley and dump the whole thing? And what about their plans  for a massive tax hike in the guise of letting the Bush tax cuts expire?

You see, to move back to the center, the Democrats and the White House would have to do a political about-face and repudiate a year of tax-and-spend policies. That might be advisable, but how likely is it? Not very. After all, Democrats fought tooth and nail for ObamaCare and Nancy Pelosi made her troops walk the plank on cap-and-trade. Daley says that if the Democrats would only follow his advice, “it may be too late to avoid some losses in 2010, [but] it is not too late to avoid the kind of rout that redraws the political map.” But they can’t–they’ve made their policy and political choices. If Daley is correct, then, after a year of Obamaism, we may be looking forward to that redrawn political map.

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