Commentary Magazine


Topic: Second Lebanon War

Tzipi Livni’s “Groundhog Day” Party List

In the movie “Groundhog Day,” in which Bill Murray’s character must relive the same day over and over again, he is overheard responding to someone on the telephone: “Well, what if there is no tomorrow? There wasn’t one today.” In October, I wrote about how one possible outcome of the upcoming Israeli elections (now precluded by more recent developments) would have put Tzipi Livni on the wrong end of an exact replay of the last time she tried to challenge current Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Today, however, Livni held a press conference in Tel Aviv that might have yet again given Israelis the sense they were stuck in their own version of “Groundhog Day”–and not one they would like to relive. The press conference was to announce that Livni will be joined on her slate of candidates by Amir Peretz. The last time the Jewish state saw the two of them serve together was in the summer of 2006, when Israel fought what was considered a badly mismanaged war with Hezbollah in southern Lebanon. The government’s handling of the conflict was clumsy and erratic, both diplomatically and strategically. As foreign minister at the time, Livni was the country’s chief diplomat, and as defense minister, Peretz was in charge of the military prosecution of the war. Now, with missiles once again aimed at Israel from southern Lebanon, the duo is asking for another shot.

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In the movie “Groundhog Day,” in which Bill Murray’s character must relive the same day over and over again, he is overheard responding to someone on the telephone: “Well, what if there is no tomorrow? There wasn’t one today.” In October, I wrote about how one possible outcome of the upcoming Israeli elections (now precluded by more recent developments) would have put Tzipi Livni on the wrong end of an exact replay of the last time she tried to challenge current Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Today, however, Livni held a press conference in Tel Aviv that might have yet again given Israelis the sense they were stuck in their own version of “Groundhog Day”–and not one they would like to relive. The press conference was to announce that Livni will be joined on her slate of candidates by Amir Peretz. The last time the Jewish state saw the two of them serve together was in the summer of 2006, when Israel fought what was considered a badly mismanaged war with Hezbollah in southern Lebanon. The government’s handling of the conflict was clumsy and erratic, both diplomatically and strategically. As foreign minister at the time, Livni was the country’s chief diplomat, and as defense minister, Peretz was in charge of the military prosecution of the war. Now, with missiles once again aimed at Israel from southern Lebanon, the duo is asking for another shot.

They will be joined on Livni’s list by Amram Mitzna–another blast from Israel’s past who was the intellectual father, in many ways, of the Gaza withdrawal that has come in for withering criticism since the recent Operation Pillar of Defense, the second such conflict since Israel left the Gaza Strip. The move by Peretz was surprising since just last week he earned a high spot on Labor’s slate in that party’s primary. The Labor party’s response? Don’t let the door hit you on the way out:

“With great relief we bid farewell to a person who tried, and failed, to sabotage the party at the height of its strength and popularity,” a statement from the party read. “His union with Tzipi Livni will not harm Labor in the slightest.”

Labor’s Isaac Herzog expressed surprise at the move, calling it “the height of political opportunism.”

Feminist activist and former columnist Merav Michaeli, who placed fifth in Labor primaries and is considered a confidante of Peretz, said the decision was not unexpected, but that she would not be joining him in Hatnua.

Yair Lapid’s Yesh Atid party issued a statement calling Peretz’s move the “most odious trick of all time.” The scathing comment employed the Hebrew term targil masriah, which was coined by Yitzhak Rabin in 1990 in response to Shimon Peres’s failed attempt to establish a narrow coalition — foiling a Yitzhak Shamir-led national union government — by concocting a clandestine deal with the ultra-Orthodox Shas party.

Israelis may believe Livni has done them a favor: by putting the famous purveyors of bad ideas and bad policy together on one slate, voters can easily avoid putting any of them back in power. If early polls are correct, that’s where this is heading.

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