A New Frontier in Human Rights Advocacy?

I have written on occasion about the ideological and political corruption of those groups that claim the mantle of human rights advocacy. The American Friends Service Committee, for example, a 1947 Nobel peace prize laureate, has since conflated pacifism with politics and has subsequently shilled for such regimes at the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, North Korea’s murderous regime, and Hamas in the Gaza Strip. Human Rights Watch has become so obsessed with the Jewish state, that it has lost its moral bearings. Indeed, Robert L. Bernstein, the founding chairman of Human Rights Watch, took to the pages of the New York Times in 2009 to call his former organization out for its bias, polemics, and lack of professionalism. It gets worse: Both Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International partnered with an al-Qaeda financier cloaking himself as a human rights advocate. Even after his terrorist designation, however, neither group bothered to review the materials that he had supplied them and which they incorporated blindly into their own reporting.

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A New Frontier in Human Rights Advocacy?

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When a Moral Conscience Outlives Its Usefulness

The complex of a nation.

“I really don’t think that it’s appropriate to attack comedians,” said ABC’s “The View” host Joy Behar this week. “We’re on the right side of things . . . We’re important people right now.”

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Outside the UN, BDS Is Losing Badly

Giving up the ghost.

BDS activists are presumably celebrating the UN Human Rights Council’s decision to warn off companies that do business with Israelis in the West Bank. I’d advise them to enjoy their temporary victory while they can. As several recent events make clear, they’re losing badly outside the UN. And they’re losing for one simple reason: People worldwide are gradually coming to understand that the boycott, divestment, and sanctions movement isn’t “anti-occupation,” it’s anti-Semitic.

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Making the World Safe for Communism—Again

Fellow babblers.

In an April 1976 essay in COMMENTARY titled “Making the World Safe for Communism,” Norman Podhoretz observed that “the Soviet Union has fewer apologists in the United States than ever before, but this is not because more people have become convinced that it is a wicked and dangerous country; it is because fewer and fewer people any longer consider the Soviet Union to be any better than the United States.” Third World revolutionary regimes still counted fans among liberal intellectuals, but, on the whole, the Communist project was intellectually exhausted by the 1970s.

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The Mystery of America’s Cuba Crisis

Where's the seriousness?

The American government’s ongoing dispute with Cuba has aroused remarkably little interest among political observers, particularly considering its objective seriousness.

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The Other Russia Scandal

One woman wrecking ball.

In her latest reinvention, Hillary Clinton has emerged from the woods transformed into a self-styled Cassandra. She travels from sound stage to sound stage, reminding the public that her 2016 loss was not her fault and the Russians who undid her once-promising political career are coming again. This newest reboot is remarkable if only for its extraordinary immodesty. Few have done so much to undermine the fortunes of their ostensible allies, but Hillary Clinton is not done yet. Her vendetta has now led her to sabotage the so-called “Resistance’s” last, best hope for cutting the legs out from under the Trump administration: Robert Mueller’s probe into the Trump campaign’s links to Russia.

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