U.S. Troop Increase in Persian Gulf Won’t Make Up for Iraqi Withdrawal

U.S. officials are fooling themselves if they think their plans to bolster the U.S. troop presence in other Persian Gulf countries will make up for the complete withdrawal of our forces from Iraq. Having troops in the smaller Gulf emirates–as we currently do–is certainly a good thing: It helps to deter Iranian aggression and safeguard the world’s supply of oil. (It also can put us in an awkward position when allies like Bahrain commit human rights abuses–but that’s another story.)

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U.S. Troop Increase in Persian Gulf Won’t Make Up for Iraqi Withdrawal

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