No Sense Denying I.F. Stone Was a Soviet Agent

Two investigative authors respond to the spy's defenders.

In the grand sweep of Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America, which tells the story of KGB activities and networks in the United States in the 1930s and 1940s, I.F. Stone is a very minor player, with only a bit part. Most of the references to him are in passing, and the totality of his activities take up only six pages out of 548 pages of text.  Stone, however, is an icon in certain journalistic precincts, and to his devotees those six pages are the only ones that matter.  His acolytes have mounted a furious and deeply dishonest response to revelations in the book (excerpted in the May issue of COMMENTARY) that in the last half of the 1930s Stone assisted the KGB in several ways- serving as a talent scout for new sources, a courier linking the KGB with sources, and a source in his own right for insider journalism information.  We concluded that he “consciously cooperated with Soviet intelligence from 1936 through 1938—that is to say, he was a Soviet spy.

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No Sense Denying I.F. Stone Was a Soviet Agent

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