Author Archive

Yuval Levin

Yuval Levin

Yuval Levin, author of The Fractured Republic, is the editor of National Affairs.

The Food and Drug Administration, created in 1906, has been one of the most successful regulators in history—carrying out the monumentally complicated task of keeping...

Embryonic stem-cell research first became possible with human cells in 1998, and became a political issue immediately thereafter. To derive the cells, researchers had to...

Considered piece by piece, the proposed immigration-reform bill hammered out last week has more to recommend it than many conservatives acknowledge. But considered as a...

Two stories in the past two weeks have raised the specter of the re-emergence of eugenics. In Britain, the government has authorized fertility clinics to...

The immigration debate has been the subject of a prime-time address by President Bush, sparked demonstrations in the streets of several major cities, and last...

Over the past week, David Gratzer of the Manhattan Institute and Jonathan Cohn of the New Republic have been engaged in a fascinating debate over...

In the latest City Journal, Peter Huber offers a must-read essay on our society’s acute and growing vulnerability to infectious disease. As he notes, it...

The Washington Post’s Dana Milbank offers a portrait of the debate on stem-cell research that took place in the Senate over the last two days. He notes...

David Frum, in the course of thoughtful comments on Rudy Giuliani’s recent troubles, writes: The single most important question pro-life Republicans need to ask themselves is...

Time’s Jay Carney finds it very peculiar that potential Republican candidates are polling better than Democrats in hypothetical presidential match-ups. After all, he says, President...

Monday’s New York Times highlighted one of the many ways that existing models of medical insurance are beginning to come undone. In this case the...

Washington Post columnist David Ignatius offers up a profoundly confused column this morning about the U.S. Attorneys scandal. He begins by noting the extraordinary public service...