Meyer Levin’s autobiographical commentary on Elliot E. Cohen’s article “Jewish Culture in America” (in last month’s COMMENTARY) will be of special interest. Though comparatively young,...

When my grandfather was alive he could walk up and down six thousand years as though it were a little narrow room; for him, all...

So far as we know, Ziviah Lubetkin’s is the only firsthand account extant of the aftermath as well as the actual events of the Jewish...

This autobiographical footnote to history brightly illuminates the process by which the principle of national self-determination, after World War I, tore apart the fabric of...

Henry Steig has been at various times a jazz musician, a cartoonist, a lifeguard, a toolmaker, a photographer, and a teacher of arts and crafts,...

Solomon Maimon, whose admiration for Maimonides led him to adopt his name, was born in a Lithuanian village in 1754. His proficiency in rabbinical studies...

Ethel Rosenberg wrote “Uncle Julius and the B.M.T.” (our November issue), which in some quarters has been hailed as a significant addition to American folklore....

Twenty years ago when I was fresh out of college I came to Palestine during a wanderyear, and was excited by the spirit of the...

The day Lefty Louie was executed, sorrow descended upon our neighborhood like a fog. Lefty was a Jew. He had committed a murder, and he...

Show Me the Way to Go Home Really The Blues. By Mezz Mezzrow and Bernard Wolfe. New York, Random House, 1946. 388 pp. $3.00. Really The Blues is the...

Until nine or ten years ago, I was a thoroughgoing Marxist. I had spent most of my life in the radical movement, and Marxism was...

In Search of a Lost Security Stefan Zweig. by Friderike Zweig. Translated by Erna McArthur. New York, Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1946. 277 pp. $3.00. Though blessed with an abundance of...