Yale Surrenders

A faculty that wants to be loved.

For much of its recent history, Yale University’s administration maintained a deliberate aloofness from its students. It focused on the development and management of the university’s physical plant, the growth of the university’s academic programs, and the cultivation of a world class faculty. Successive Yale leaders also understood that pandering to undergraduate students would be thankless and counterproductive. After all, the majority of Yalies’ political activism could be chalked up to exploration and testing boundaries rather than substantive political thought. True, generations of undergraduates succumbed to various political fads organized and demonstrated on the campus’ Beineke Plaza and sometimes even sought to invade Woodbridge Hall, where the university president maintained its offices. But students grow up, and most became productive and decidedly more moderate members of society upon graduation.

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Yale Surrenders

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Preening doesn't work.

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Leave Jack Phillips Alone!

The limits of religious liberty.

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Whatever Donald wants, he's gonna get it.

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