The New York Times Piles on Kushner’s Critic

When the Board of Trustees of the City University of New York voted not to give an honorary degree to playwright Tony Kushner, they violated the prime directive of Gotham’s cultural elites: Thou shalt not hold any liberal icon accountable for anything they do. The penalty for violating this unwritten but clearly inviolable rule is the ultimate disgrace: multiple articles in the New York Times on the same day, denouncing your decision.

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The New York Times Piles on Kushner’s Critic

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A Conclusion in Search of Evidence

Donald Trump's immigration ban is a policy without logic.

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The War on Truth in Europe

Russia's distortions are blurring the line between truth and lies.

There has been a lot of talk in the United States lately about “fake news” (the accusation that President Trump tosses out to discredit unfavorable articles) and “alternative facts” (the phrase that Kellyanne Conway used to justify the White House propagation of falsehoods about the size of the inaugural crowd and other matters). But it’s important to remember that these devices were neither invented in the United States nor confined to our shores. Russia is the world leader in both areas, if in nothing else.

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A Reform to Stand the Test of Time

For Republicans, it’s time to choose: their careers or their country.

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North Korea’s Chemical Terrorism

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Social Conservatism’s Resurrection

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