U.S. Recognizes Muslim Brotherhood. Will Hamas Be Next?

In a reversal of a five-year-old U.S. policy banning contact with the Muslim Brotherhood organization in Egypt, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has ordered American diplomats to resume contact with the Islamist group. Clinton made the following statement at a news conference in Budapest:

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U.S. Recognizes Muslim Brotherhood. Will Hamas Be Next?

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New Rule: White Women Should Not Study Black Communities

There is no scholarship, only identity.

Alice Goffman, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, is a controversial scholar. Her book, On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City is based on Goffman’s six year immersion in a black neighborhood in West Philadelphia.

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Winning the Release of the Unjustly Imprisoned

Playing a good hand well.

Both President Donald Trump’s supporters and detractors credit his approach with helping to win the release of Egyptian-American Aya Hijazi, an NGO worker imprisoned in Egypt for three years on meritless charges. The Washington Post explained:

An Egyptian American charity worker who was imprisoned in Cairo for three years and became the global face of Egypt’s brutal crackdown on civil society returned home to the United States late Thursday after the Trump administration quietly negotiated her release. President Trump and his aides worked for several weeks with Egyptian President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi to secure the freedom of Aya Hijazi, 30, a U.S. citizen, as well as her husband, Mohamed Hassanein, who is Egyptian, and four other humanitarian workers.

The logic behind the article goes like this: Whereas President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry sought to bash Egypt, unsuccessfully seeking to compel the release of an unjustly imprisoned American with sanctions, Trump was wise to establish a positive working relationship with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. It was the quiet diplomacy coupled with symbolic acts such as welcoming Sisi to the White House, which led the Egyptian leader to change his mind.

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Coming to Grips with WikiLeaks

It seems Julian Assange is an enemy of the United States again.

Critics of Donald Trump’s approach to campaigning for the White House have every reason to claim vindication. In the transition from campaigning to governing, this administration has done several about-faces. Perhaps none are more surprising, or more welcome, than the revelation that Trump’s Department of Justice is preparing to seek the arrest of WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange.

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A Pathetic 2017 for BDS

BDS knows it cannot win a fair fight.

I was beginning to feel a little sorry for campus boycott activists. After all, if any year was going to be their year, it was 2017. You would think that even the most poisonous variants of the politics of the left would do reasonably well in the atmosphere created by the surprise victory of Donald Trump.

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The Democratic Party: A Brand in Crisis

The Democratic Party has a brand problem, and it doesn't seem to care.

“There are a lot of people who have Democratic values who may not see themselves as a Democrat,” confessed Democratic National Committee Vice Chairman Michael Blake. Someone ought to explain this to the party’s big attraction, the figure on whom Democrats have pinned their hopes for a political comeback: Bernie Sanders. The septuagenarian senator from Vermont, who narrowly missed an opportunity to wrest the party’s presidential nomination from the anointed Hillary Clinton, is a living, breathing example of the crisis afflicting the Democratic Party’s brand.