The New York Times, Its Editor, and Her Canine Staff

There are many eye-opening details in Ken Auletta’s massive New Yorker piece on the ascension of Jill Abramson to the editorship of the New York Times—suffice it to say that while he seems to admire her, he makes her sound pretty dreadful—but surely the most startling is this passage, which refers to the dog she got in 2007 that is the subject of her new book, The Puppy Diaries:

She planned to apply in the newsroom some of the “positive training” that she lavished on Scout. She and her husband, she writes in her book, used “encouragement, not punishment” to train Scout, rewarding her for good behavior with a piece of kibble. “In one’s relationship with dogs and with a newsroom, a generous amount of praise and encouragement goes much better than criticism,” she says.

This is apparently because she was known to be berating and abusive. So now Jill Abramson will improve her management skills by treating the employees of the New York Times as though they were dogs!

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The New York Times, Its Editor, and Her Canine Staff

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