America Must Commit to Both the Far East and Middle East

It was great to see President Obama signing an accord with Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard to station several thousand U.S. Marines in Australia, thus deepening what is already one of America’s closest defense alliances. It was only a few years ago–in 2007 to be exact–that Australia elected a Chinese-speaking prime minister (Kevin Rudd, now the foreign minister) and all the talk was about how Australia needed to expand its ties with China, now its largest trading partner. But China’s aggressive behavior since, which threatens regional stability, has driven Australia to draw ever closer to the U.S. The same phenomenon is evident across East Asia; even Communist Vietnam is seeking American ties to ward off the looming Chinese hegemon. The new accord is a sign the U.S. is having some success in balancing the growth of Chinese power–something that should remain a priority for the future.

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America Must Commit to Both the Far East and Middle East

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Denunciations.

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