Obama Playing by Rowhani’s Timetable

The problem with the willingness of so many in the West to buy into the myth that Hassan Rowhani’s election in Iran provides a meaningful opening for nuclear diplomacy isn’t so much the possibility that the U.S. will be suckered into a terrible agreement with Tehran. The Iranians have proved time and again—including during the time when it was Rowhani being the chief deceiver—that they are never going to sign any deal that will place meaningful restrictions on their ability to enrich uranium. There is even less chance that the ayatollahs will allow the West to impose a solution that will “end” Iran’s nuclear program as the president pledged to do during the foreign policy debate with Mitt Romney last fall. No matter how many concessions the United States and its European allies offer Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the answer is always going to be no to any accord.

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Obama Playing by Rowhani’s Timetable

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It's a duck.

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Challenging Violent Speech—Unless It’s About Israel

The border of incitement.

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Polish Democracy in the Balance

Democracy dies while the president looks the other way.

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How Corruption Cripples American Universities

Are the rewards worth the costs?

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