Maliki’s Exit Doesn’t Change a Thing

It’s popular to blame sectarian violence in Iraq on the person of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. It’s also wrong. Maliki reflects many in the political class. Almost any politician in Iraq thinks to some extent through a sectarian or an ethnic lens simply because Iraqi political parties are organized largely around ethnic or religious identity, instead of economic or social philosophy.

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Maliki’s Exit Doesn’t Change a Thing

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The War on Bathroom Privacy

One young woman has had enough.

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A Beautiful Mind

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Over the last decade, the culinary arts have become something of a spectator sport. Cooking on television was once the province of daytime chat shows geared toward homemakers with a focus on simplicity, but the last ten years have seen a proliferation of programs dedicated to revealing the secrets of great chefs who cook in small kitchens for customers paying hundreds of dollars per table. Cooking on TV has become an escape; we watch people make wondrous creations that delight all the senses but that we, in all likelihood, will never experience ourselves. From Netflix’s “Chef’s Table” to Fox’s “Master Chef Junior,” consumers seek out radiant plating, molecular technique, and elevated fare.

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The Cheapening of War

Disfiguring the language.

Since modern progressive liberalism has existed, its adherents have longed to see the flexibility afforded to political leaders during wartime extend to matters off the battlefield as well. When President Jimmy Carter told Americans to forego certain luxuries and prioritize fuel production amid an energy crisis, he was explicitly saying the same thing that the pacifist William James argued in 1910. We must “inflame the civic temper,” James insisted, to construct houses like we build battleships. Both advocated a new outlook on American civic affairs: “the moral equivalent of war.” In war, passions are excited, minds are focused, and paths are cleared to achieve great collective works without the legal impediments that preserve a democratic republic’s lawful character.

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Please, COMMENTARY Podcast, Enlighten Me

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Anything for the Ayatollah

The law is no obstacle.

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