Israel’s Energy Boom Still in Doubt

Last year it seemed as if doubts about Israel’s bright energy future were put to rest. A clever move by Prime Minister Netanyahu’s government allowed the country’s Security Government to overrule an anti-trust commissioner who might have placed impossible legal obstacles in front of the effort to exploit the gas field called “Leviathan,” a massive off shore reserve. As Arthur Herman wrote in a 2014 cover story for COMMENTARY, the gas finds meant Israel was on the brink of becoming the world’s “next energy superpower.” After years of starts and stops and enough plot twists to fill a few novels, it appeared that Netanyahu had finally put in a place a plan that would allow the work to begin on Leviathan. More than that, recently concluded deals with Turkey and Greece and Cyprus to create an international pipeline to transport the gas ensured that the work would go forward and that there were international markets for Israel’s gas that would help enrich the nation even as its own energy needs were met.

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Israel’s Energy Boom Still in Doubt

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