Can Israel Find New Allies?

Critics may correctly point out that the Iran nuclear deal is technically illegal and hope to eventually reverse it. But such arguments aren’t going to stop the Obama administration from implementing it. That creates a dangerous new landscape for Israel to navigate, especially since it is now faced with an American administration that is avowedly dedicated to creating more “daylight” between the Jewish state and Washington. Many in both countries hope the meeting between Israeli Prime Minister and President Obama in November can help start the process of rebuilding a relationship that has been rocked by the fight over Iran. But, as Shmuel Rosner writes in the New York Times today, it isn’t realistic to think that a meeting or any amount of good feeling can paper over the divide that currently exists between the two countries as the U.S. begins to invest heavily in détente with the Islamist regime. Like many Israelis, Rosner thinks the moral of this story isn’t so much to chastise Netanyahu for challenging Obama as it is to understand that the Jewish state can’t rely solely on the U.S. for diplomatic support as well as necessary military aid. But though there is a superficial logic to this assertion, it is something of a fallacy. The solution for friends of Israel lies not in a realpolitik outreach to increasingly friendly nations like India or dangerous frenemies like Russia. Israel may look for friends elsewhere, but there is no real alternative to the alliance with America and that means working to change the dangerous shift in U.S. policy under Obama.

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Can Israel Find New Allies?

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