Is the West Encouraging Palestinian Terror?

As Rosh Hashanah began in Israel this week, the most ordinary of events occurred on a road in Jerusalem. Palestinians rained down rocks on what they thought was a car being driven by a Jew. In this case, it was a 64-year-old Jew returning home after a holiday dinner. The result was a fatal crash in which the Jew died. While fatalities from such incidents are not a daily occurrence, attacks on Jewish cars and pedestrians with rocks and fire bombs are so routine, as to be considered not particularly newsworthy even in Israel. But when Prime Minister Netanyahu responded to this and similar incidents by saying his government intended to wage a war on those who hurl such lethal projectiles, you can bet it will be interpreted as further evidence of Israeli belligerence rather than proof that the Palestinians don’t want peace. Like the similar provocations on Jerusalem’s Temple Mount where Muslim harassment of Jewish tourists to the site have gotten out of control, any Israeli effort to push back against terrorism is seen as being somehow the fault of the Jews while Palestinians committing crimes are seen as innocent youths performing what the New York Times described as a “rite of passage.” But it’s worth asking those Western observers who sympathize with or rationalize these attacks on Jews whether they would consider such attacks on their cars in the U.S. and Europe to be anything but attempted murder.

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Is the West Encouraging Palestinian Terror?

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