Washington’s Stance on Maritime Border Makes Israel-Lebanon War More Likely

As Omri noted yesterday, Washington is backing Beirut against Jerusalem in their dispute over the Israel-Lebanon maritime border. But by doing so, it isn’t merely cozying up to Hezbollah. It’s actively rewarding aggression – and encouraging war.

0
Shares
Google+ Print

Washington’s Stance on Maritime Border Makes Israel-Lebanon War More Likely

Must-Reads from Magazine

Beinart’s Complaint

Peter Beinart makes his critics' arguments for them.

Peter Beinart is part of a cast of liberals lamenting the fact that conservatives who were skeptical of Donald Trump during the campaign have inexplicably declined to join him in the Democratic party now that Trump is president. And he is now among a more select group on the left to name names in an effort to shame such people over their seeming hypocrisy. Except he doesn’t call it hypocrisy. Rather, Beinart’s argument is that these conservatives don’t share his prohibitive focus on Trump to the exclusion of virtually every other matter of public policy relevance or political salience. And so Beinart inadvertently validates the arguments of those he sought to condemn.

6
Shares
Google+ Print

Beware Triggering the Coup Theory

Time for a national deep breath

I can’t believe I’m writing this after the administration has been in office for 26 days, but here goes. The idea that Donald Trump is now inexorably on a path to impeachment has taken almost gleeful hold in the wake of the Michael Flynn resignation among liberal elites and anti-Trumpers generally—and everybody better stop and take a deep breath and consider what might arise from this. This isn’t fire we’re playing with, it’s a nuclear war.

57
Shares
Google+ Print

Tackling Kleptocracy

Combating kleptocracy on a global scale.

Vladimir Putin in Russia. Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Turkey. North Korea’s Kim Jong-un. Iraqi Kurdistan’s Masoud Barzani. Equatorial Guinea’s Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo. The late Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani and Muammar Qadhafi in Iran and Libya respectively. Each has leveraged their political positions into vast fortunes ranging from hundreds of millions to tens of billions of dollars for themselves and their immediate families.

7
Shares
Google+ Print

Is Israel Top Military Aid Recipient?

There is more than one way to calculate U.S. foreign aid.

It has become a rhetorical staple for many—in the progressive left, among the libertarian and isolationist right, and among anti-Israel obsessives—that Israel benefits disproportionately from U.S. military aid and assistance. In the wake of a ten-year $36 billion deal negotiated by the Obama administration in its final months, The Atlantic tackled the subject:

Voters, however, have more mixed views on this kind of support. While more than 60 percent of Americans were more sympathetic to Israel than the Palestinians in a 2016 Gallup poll, sympathies differed along partisan lines, with around half of Democrats being more sympathetic to Israelis versus nearly 80 percent of Republicans. In a separate Brookings poll, roughly half of Democrats who responded said Israel has too much influence on the United States government. Boycott, divest, and sanction movements, which call on organizations in the United States and abroad to cut their financial ties with Israel, have long been popular on college campuses, although somewhat marginal; this year, however, they got a boost from the Black Lives Matter movement, which included statements against Israel’s treatment of Palestinians in its recently released policy platform. In general, young Americans are far less sympathetic toward Israel than their older peers: A 2014 Gallup poll found that only half of those aged 18 to 34 favored Israel in the Israel-Palestine conflict, “compared with 58 percent of 35- to 54-year-olds and 74 percent of those 55 and older.” Bernie Sanders, who was extremely popular among young people during the Democratic primary season, controversially criticized Israel, winning “applause and cheers” from the audience at one debate for saying, “If we pursue justice and peace, we are going to have to say that Netanyahu is not right all of the time.” All of this creates an odd backdrop for a historic military-spending deal….

9
Shares
Google+ Print

An Overdue Punishment for Venezuela

Trump punishes Venezuela with a speed that greatly improves on Obama's.

The Trump Treasury Department’s move to impose sanctions on and to freeze the assets of a series of high-profile Venezuelan actors—including the country’s new vice president—is a welcome development. It has been a long time coming and follows years of investigation into the targets’ assets and activities related to the trafficking of narcotics. The alacrity with which the Trump Treasury Department acted against these officials, however, contrasts mightily with the Obama administration’s lethargy when it came to Venezuela. The sluggish pace at which the Obama White House moved to punish Venezuelan officials for violating international law and human rights will forever remain a stain on that administration.