UNESCO and the End of U.S. Honor

On Monday, some Democratic members of Congress and a united front of major Jewish organizations expressed outrage over the imminent prospect that the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) would vote to declare Jerusalem’s Western Wall to be a part of the al-Aqsa mosque. That one-sided resolution was proposed at the UNESCO executive council by six Arab nations acting on behalf of the Palestinian Authority and may be adopted as soon as Tuesday. The resolution also included a laundry list of anti-Israel measures including condemnations of Israeli self-defense against terrorist attacks as well as of the Jewish presence in Jerusalem. The certain passage of the resolution will confirm UNESCO’s moral bankruptcy and act to further incite Palestinian violence against Jews. But on the same day that some Americans were voicing outrage about what the UN agency was doing, the nation’s chief diplomat was at the group’s Paris headquarters to speak to that same executive council with a very different agenda. On Monday, Secretary of State John Kerry came to UNESCO hat in hand, praising the group and begging for the U.S. to be re-elected to the group’s executive board while not even mentioning the resolution that it would soon pass.

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UNESCO and the End of U.S. Honor

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