Why Palestinian Corruption Matters

In 2005, an extremely wealthy old friend of Yasir Arafat’s, Munib al-Masri, spoke about the missed opportunities he witnessed during Arafat’s time in power for an article in the Atlantic. Here is what he told the author of that piece, David Samuels:

With three hundred, four hundred million dollars we could have built Palestine in ten years. Waste, waste, waste. I flew over the West Bank in a helicopter with Arafat at the beginning of Oslo, and I told him how easy we could make five, six, seven towns here; we could absorb a lot of people here; and have the right of return for the refugees. If you have good intentions and you say you want to reach a solution, we could do it. I said, if you have money and water, it could be comparable to Israel, this piece of land.

It doesn’t sound like a lot of money, a few hundred million dollars. Yet since that helicopter ride, according to a new Congressional Research Service report, the U.S. has given the Palestinians about $4 billion. They didn’t build the state, as al-Masri hoped.

0
Shares
Google+ Print

Why Palestinian Corruption Matters

Must-Reads from Magazine

An Orwellian Education Law in Britain

The freedom to follow.

Brexit was supposed to liberate Britons from unaccountable government, PC orthodoxy, and high-handed bureaucracy. But who needs Brussels mandarins when supposed Conservatives in Westminster are beholden to the same orthodoxies?

43
Shares
Google+ Print

The Rob Porter Scandal Is Now the Trump Scandal

A debacle becomes a disaster.

For the last two weeks, Washington has been fixated on a farcically complex issue involving the oversight of federal law-enforcement and intelligence agencies. In the minds of most voters, however, the president’s well-received State of the Union Address probably loomed larger than the squabbling over whose memo was the most scandalous. That’s over.

21
Shares
Google+ Print

Vote on North Korea Now, Before It’s Too Late

When power is on the table, someone will use it.

Today, American soldiers are deployed on sovereign foreign soil without the authorization of the host government. In fact, they’re often in conflict with forces loyal to that government. This is a condition we used to call an invasion. To call it what is, though, would be to shatter a convenient fiction.

8
Shares
Google+ Print

The Familiar Degeneracy of the Rob Porter Affair

The view from inside the bunker.

“As you know, we’re under siege,” President Donald Trump told the rapt attendees of Ralph Reed’s Faith and Freedom Coalition conference last June. The audience heard “we,” but the president was likely speaking about himself. The president’s persecution complex is infectious and it’s leading Republicans around Trump to make decisions they will regret for years to come.

40
Shares
Google+ Print

Taking Back the Language

A rhetorical fight.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stumbled into controversy this week, although it was perhaps unwarranted. Trudeau became the subject of derision and mockery when he interrupted a woman at a town hall to correct her use of the term “mankind,” suggesting that she replace this dated designation with the more inclusive “peoplekind.” He only offered his proposal after enduring several minutes of a rambling new-age monologue regarding the chemical composition of “maternal love.” Trudeau’s interjection was probably flippant, but neither his interlocutor nor his critics seemed to notice. It’s hard to blame them.

23
Shares
Google+ Print