2016 is Now About Replacing Scalia

This weekend the nation is mourning Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia who died on Saturday at the age of 79. Scalia was one of the most influential legal thinkers and brilliant writers and personalities ever to serve on the Supreme Court. More than any other jurist, he was the one that did more to promote the idea of originalism — the notion that judges should interpret the Constitution as the Founders intended — and textualism – the idea that the words of the Constitution mean what they say. He was the intellectual leader and the backbone of the conservative majority that has prevailed in many cases in the last decades as well as the author of scathing and insightful dissents that may be remembered as long as his majority opinions. At the same time, he will also be justly celebrated as a man who was able to friends with liberal colleagues even as he engaged in spirited arguments with them. That is an example that more Americans should follow in a time of increased polarization.

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2016 is Now About Replacing Scalia

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When Trump fights on values, he wins.

For approximately 18 minutes, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly accomplished the impossible: He got America’s journalists and political opinion writers to shut up and listen.

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Bush’s Finest Hour

More than just Trump.

On Thursday, George W. Bush delivered a speech at the “Spirit of Liberty: At Home, In The World” event in New York City. Headlines are touting the speech as an attack on Trumpism. That’s accurate, so far as it goes. But it’s clear from Bush’s words that he was aiming for (and achieved) something loftier than yet another complaint about the 45th president. Bush was making the case against the pervasive discontent that’s driven many citizens throughout the Democratic West to a politics of grievance and revenge. Trumpism is but one example.

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The Danger of the Me Too Campaign

Denunciations.

Silence, Wordsworth wrote, “is a privilege of the grave, a right of the departed. Let him, therefore, who infringes that right by speaking publicly of, for, or against, those who cannot speak for themselves, take heed that he opens not his mouth without a sufficient sanction.”

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Fake News Will Never Die

A problem with no solution.

Though it’s certainly the worst Photoshop job I have ever seen, a provocative image making the rounds on social media also helps demonstrate why the fight against “fake news” is unwinnable.

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The Great Stock Market Crash of 1987

Still the blackest Monday.

Thirty years ago today—October 19th, 1987—the bottom dropped out of the stock market.

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