More Interesting Than the Penn E-Mails

What would we ever do without the foreign press? One of my colleagues alerts me to this report from the U.K. about Barack Obama’s relationship with George Clooney:

‘George is pushing him to be more “balanced” on issues such as US relations with Israel. George is pro-Palestinian. And he is also urging Barack to withdraw unconditionally from Iraq if he wins. It’s a very risky relationship. His hope of becoming America’s first black President depends heavily on winning over conservative voters and it would be suicidal for him to be perceived as a tool of a Hollywood Leftie, which is how they regard George. But they text and email each other almost every day and speak on the phone at least a couple of times a week, often more.’ The Ocean’s Eleven star is among many Hollywood figures to have endorsed Obama, including Barbra Streisand, Scarlett Johansson, Warren Beatty and Steven Spielberg. One of Clooney’s trusted acquaintances said: ‘George is a master at crafting his own image and he is helping Obama to hone his image both domestically and abroad. ‘He told me he feels Obama is a once-in-a-lifetime leader. He is doing everything he can behind the scenes to bolster support in Hollywood, not just with other celebrities but with the money men at the studios.’ The acquaintance added: ‘He has tried to keep the true extent of their involvement out of the Press because he is frightened of alienating voters.’

Yeah, it’s probably a good idea that voters in the U.S. don’t find out that he is spending his time listening to left-wing claptrap from a movie star. People might get the idea that Obama is not a serious candidate, or at the very least can’t even muster up the nerve to tell his own adoring friends that he disagrees with their brilliant discourses on national security. Worse yet, they might think that private emails with his closest admirers provide a more telling insight into the mind of The Chosen One than carefully-crafted speeches by campaign advisors.

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More Interesting Than the Penn E-Mails

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