What Else Was on Hillary’s Second E-Mail?

When we found out that Hillary Clinton used a private email for work purposes while serving as secretary of state, it was possible to argue that there was nothing improper about it even if it was hard to explain. The deletion of tens of thousand of those emails that were said to be personal and the wiping of the home server on which they were contained was a lot to harder to explain and raised questions about what might have been on the missing messages. But the news that Clinton had a second active private email account during this same period despite assurances to the contrary from her lawyer and the presidential candidate that there was nothing more to learn about this affair should set off even more alarms. The use of the second address was discovered in the investigation of the involvement of veteran Clinton machine hit man Sidney Blumenthal in formulating policy toward Libya during the period preceding the Benghazi terror attack. The deeper we dive into the tangled affairs of the Clintons, the more complications and lies we discover.

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What Else Was on Hillary’s Second E-Mail?

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Trump Helps Obama’s Team Recognize How Disastrous Their Policies Were

Ulterior motives.

Those in Barack Obama’s orbit were fond of commandeering the title of his second book, Audacity of Hope, and applying it to just about everything the president or his administration did. Obama delivers a speech extolling the benefits of modernity? “Audacity.” Obama wears a tan suit to a press conference? “Audacity.” Obama defies his party’s extremes while achieving some incremental legislative successes? “Audacity.” The former president’s admirers have appropriated the word’s positive connotations—daring, fearless, spunky, transgressive self-assuredness—but the word has an alternate definition that is equally apt but rarely applied to Obama or his courtiers. That’s a shame, too, because the impertinence the former administration’s leading lights often display sure is audacious.

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Podcast: Trump, trade, and temerity.

Donald Trump heads to Singapore for a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un fresh off a pretty contentious summit with the G-7 nations in which conflicts over trade policy blew up into a full-scale war of insults between the American and Canadian governments. What does this mean for the Atlantic alliance and the North Korean summit? Also, the attacks on Trump at the Tony Awards over the weekend leads to a discussion of the value of civility.

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The War on Bathroom Privacy

One young woman has had enough.

The transgender movement expects Americans to deny the most basic truths about bodily sex and human nature, and whether out of fear or apathy, most acquiesce. But 19-year-old Alexis Lightcap won’t go along. She insists that male and female bodies are different, and that the difference has important consequences for the privacy and dignity of men and women alike. She’s prepared to go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court to make the point.

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A Beautiful Mind

Anthony Bourdain, 1956 - 2018.

Over the last decade, the culinary arts have become something of a spectator sport. Cooking on television was once the province of daytime chat shows geared toward homemakers with a focus on simplicity, but the last ten years have seen a proliferation of programs dedicated to revealing the secrets of great chefs who cook in small kitchens for customers paying hundreds of dollars per table. Cooking on TV has become an escape; we watch people make wondrous creations that delight all the senses but that we, in all likelihood, will never experience ourselves. From Netflix’s “Chef’s Table” to Fox’s “Master Chef Junior,” consumers seek out radiant plating, molecular technique, and elevated fare.

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The Cheapening of War

Disfiguring the language.

Since modern progressive liberalism has existed, its adherents have longed to see the flexibility afforded to political leaders during wartime extend to matters off the battlefield as well. When President Jimmy Carter told Americans to forego certain luxuries and prioritize fuel production amid an energy crisis, he was explicitly saying the same thing that the pacifist William James argued in 1910. We must “inflame the civic temper,” James insisted, to construct houses like we build battleships. Both advocated a new outlook on American civic affairs: “the moral equivalent of war.” In war, passions are excited, minds are focused, and paths are cleared to achieve great collective works without the legal impediments that preserve a democratic republic’s lawful character.

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