All Ron Paul Backers Can Do is Complain

As Alana noted, Ron Paul’s speech at his Tampa rally yesterday was an appropriate swan song to a political career during which the Texas congressman has promoted a view of foreign policy that would probably earn more applause from left-wing Democrats than Republicans. Paul won’t speak at the Republican convention this week, but the 177 delegates he won will be there and the media is counting on them to provide a more interesting story line than the scheduled speakers will provide. But given the rules and the “nosebleed” seats being assigned to those state delegations where Paul supporters are numerous, it’s not clear that the adherents to what Paul calls his “liberty movement” will be able to cause much trouble.

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All Ron Paul Backers Can Do is Complain

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Fear a ‘Post-West World’

What would a Russia-led 'Post-West' order would look like?

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov did the world a service this weekend when he abandoned coyly evasive and tiresome Russian diplo-speak by outright advocating for the creation of a “post-West world order.” These comments, made before an audience of European and American security professionals who are already sufficiently spooked by Donald Trump’s campaign-trail flirtation with the abandonment of the Atlantic alliance, surely disturbed the conference’s Western attendees. Good. It is about time that someone properly framed the stakes of the ideological and strategic competition between revisionist powers and the Western-led post-War order. The West’s intellectual elite certainly are not up to the task.

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Have We Overestimated Asia?

Have policymakers missed the boat on Asia?

The rise of China as an economic and, perhaps, military power has for more than two decades dominated strategic conversations in Washington and New York, much as fear that the Japanese economy could overtake America became a cultural obsession in the 1980s. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman has penned a number of columns proclaiming the virtues and wisdom of China’s one-party, command-economy. Meanwhile, China’s military sabre-rattles and challenges the United States increasingly far from China’s shores.

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Globalizing Global Security

Standardizing the U.S. military advisor corps.

All the way back in 2007, Lt. Col. John Nagl suggested, in a paper for the Center for New American Security, that it was time for the U.S. Army to form a dedicated Advisor Corps in order to give greater priority to assisting allied militaries in countries such as Afghanistan and Iraq. This has become a core military mission, but it is has been addressed in a haphazard manner by pulling personnel out of existing units. Moreover, it has never gotten the support or recognition that it deserves. Nagl proposed to change that.

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When Conservatism Ceased to Shock

The right's talkers no longer see conservatism as sufficiently transgressive.

Milo Yiannopoulos fancies himself a provocateur. His track record of behaving in ways designed to shock and provoke and the name recognition his antics have yielded would lead any observer to conclude he is pretty good at his chosen profession. Surely, he must be as surprised as anyone that, of all things, an invitation to serve as the keynote speaker at this year’s Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) inaugurated a forensic examination of his past statements, which has already cost him his book deal.

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The McMaster Class

Podcast: Does the Trump administration have a doctrinal worldview?

On the first of the week’s podcast, the COMMENTARY gang (Noah, Abe, and I) discuss the appointment of H.R. McMaster as national security adviser, the rise in anti-Semitic threats and Donald Trump’s eventual response to them, and the question of who actually makes policy in the new administration. It’s hectic. It’s passionate. It’s a little incoherent. Give a listen.

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