Preserving Integrity in Middle Eastern Studies

academic integrity

David Silverstein, executive director of the Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa (ASMEA), has written to object to my post from last week, “Educators, Don’t Let Yourselves Be Used by Middle Eastern Autocrats.” Silverstein’s letter is below, followed by a brief rejoinder:

I am writing in response to Michael Rubin’s recent article about ASMEA that grossly mischaracterized the efforts of the Association, and to request either a correction of the record or the right to rebut some of the assertions made in the article.

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