Tillerson’s Terrorism Problem

Tillerson should be alienating terror sympathizers, not rehabilitating them.

Over at the Washington Free Beacon, Adam Kredo has the scoop that the Trump administration will welcome. He wrote:

The State Department confirmed to the Washington Free Beacon late Thursday that it intends to permit Jibril Rajoub, secretary of the Fatah Central Committee, to participate in meetings with U.S. officials next week, despite his repeated calls for terrorism against Israel and a 15-year stint in Israeli prison for committing terror acts. A State Department official who spoke to the Free Beacon acknowledged Rajoub’s radical rhetoric, but maintained he can serve a positive role in peace talks set to take place between Trump administration officials and a Palestinian delegation including Mahmoud Abbas… Legal experts claim that Rajoub’s endorsement of terrorism should prevent him from obtaining a U.S. visa under current laws. U.S. law bars entrance to individuals who “endorse or espouse terrorist activity.” The Trump administration has no plans to acquiesce to this call, according to a State Department spokesman. “The U.S. government does not endorse every statement Mr. Rajoub has made, but he has long been involved in Middle East peace efforts, and has publicly supported a peaceful, non-violent solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict,” the official told the Free Beacon. “We continue to press Fatah officials, including Rajoub himself, to refrain from any statements or actions that could be viewed as inciting or legitimizing others use of violence.”

As the quip apocryphally attributed to Albert Einstein goes, “insanity is repeatedly doing the same action but expecting different results each time.” If that’s true, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson or those diplomats whispering into his ear should check in with their shrink.

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Tillerson’s Terrorism Problem

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